Suma Powder  Pfaffia paniculata
In South America suma is known as para toda (which means "for all things") and as Brazilian ginseng, since it is widely used as an adaptogen with many applications (much as "regular" ginseng). The indigenous peoples of the Amazon region who named it para toda have used suma root for generations for a wide variety of health purposes, including as a general tonic; as an energy, rejuvenating, and sexual tonic; and as a general cure-all for many types of illnesses. Suma has been used as an aphrodisiac, a calming agent, and to treat ulcers for at least 300 years.
Price: £Not available - For information only
Huacapu Powder  Minquartia guianensis
The bark is also often used as a malaria remedy, as well as for tuberculosis, hepatitis, and rheumatism by various Indian communities in the Amazon. The outer bark is considered "too strong a medicine" therefore, more often, the inner bark is used when preparing remedies for humans.
Price: £Not available - For information only
Cumaseba Powder  Swartzia polyphylla
In the Amazon, the bark and/or wood of the cumaseba tree is employed as a postpartum tonic, for rheumatism, and to speed the healing of bone fractures and dislocations. The Tirio Indians in Suriname prepare the bark in a decoction for malaria.
Price: £Not available - For information only
Joint-Muscle Support (traditional use - Joints & Musclesl)
A powerful formula of 8 rainforest botanicals to nutritionally support joints and muscles. Has shown to be of benefit to Arthritis / Rheumatism sufferers.
Price: £24.95 for 120 capsules
Abuta Powder  Cissampelos pareira.
Abuta has many traditional uses especially for women, it is used for menstrual problems, Fibroids, endometriosis, as well as being a hormonal balancing tonic. Another general use is purported to be for kidney stones and urinary tract infections.
Price: £Not available - For information only

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